Jul 15, 2004

Name the @ Symbol

What is the @ symbol called in e-mail addresses?: "We've checked with several sources, including the Dictionary for Writers and Editors and the Oxford English Dictionary. There is actually no correct designation for this symbol, @." That's unacceptable. First of all, the @ symbol deserves it's own key on a keyboard (I use it way more than the 2 key). And my sources tell me it has a name in other languages besides English so let's do this thing. Name the @!

26 comments:

CarLBanks said...

My names for it.

#1. At
#2. A with a circle around it
#3. A with a long curvy tail

FH said...

Your sources are right :) In Portuguese, at least, the @ symbol is called "arroba". It used to mean a weight measure but it has been misteriously updated to stand for the @ symbol.

Rick said...

It is an A with a circle around it. How about the "A Whole"?

Geoffrey said...

In French, we named it "Arobase"

Sam said...

Given it's most ubiquitous application, I think we should call it "Spam". As in "my e-mail adress is bob underscore g spam google dot com"

randy said...

Definition of "Ampersand", or "@" follows

When creating a new typeface, a designer can inject the most artistic flair into the ampersand character. The term ampersand, as Geoffrey Glaister writes in his "Glossary of the Book," is a corruption of and (&) per se and, which literally means "(the character) & by itself (is the word) and." The symbol & is derived from the ligature of ET or et, which is the Latin word for "and."

Gideon Starorzewski said...

Three possible names for the @ symbol:
1) Buster
2) Rogelio
3) Ned

Circlesquare said...

The 'AT' theme:
Long tail, bit in the middle looking faintly feline ... cAT
Coiled and serpentine ... ATtlesnake

Expressing a sense of discovery:
Aha!

And again on the animal vibe:
Snail (Substituting this when reading someone's email address out loud adds a certain comic disdain, I think).

Biz said...

Randy: The & symbol gets a cool name: ampersand. The @ symbol doesn't have a name yet. Ampersand is a cool name. That's why I'm thinking it'd be neat if we came up with a name for the @ symbol.

Siona said...

How about something nice and self-referential, like th@?

Kevin said...

You could call it cAThy, although I a bit more drawn to George if I'm honest.

If a scientific like name is required then I would plump for "EctoWheeWhee" as that just sounds awesome.

rodrigo terra said...

I would call it "woof"; I am a dog person, you see :)....

cableclair said...

in Dutch it's called apenstaartje (which means monkeytail)

Billy said...

You my genius firend are the man! You have got it going on! I hardly know you but you have me convinced you are a blogging prodigy! You keep up the good work!

maz-b. said...

In Germany we say "Klammeraffe". Word by word it means "Cling-Monkey" :-D
My dictionary says, there is a symbol for it: "at sign"!

Pete said...

How about the swirly?

Or a fun noise, like how ! is "bang." Perhaps "whoosh"?

Jason said...

It's... AT - It's a defacto-standard symbol for email addresses seperator to define the end of the username and start the fully qualified domain name.

yourname AT youdomain DOT topleveldomain

Please don't make it something in dutch... the noobs already don't understand where they have to "MASH the mouse button on to make that funny lookin' A."

Biz said...

Ooh. I kinda like "the swirly." And that monkey tail business is good stuff.

sarchi said...

Graphics: http://www.well.com/introwell/index.html (the well) use it in their artware to symbolize the uniqueness of the the web..

Psybertron said...

What's wrong with "at" ?

turbofisk said...

In Sweden we call them "Snabel-A". Snabel translates to the trunk an elephant has...

macfixer said...

i always thought it was called an 'atmark'.
:-/

-k

~C4Chaos said...

my suggestions:

1. "ah" (pronounced the same as the Dzogchen Tibetan symbol)
2. a-hole (go figure)
3. alpha
4. and the ever popular "at"

rip, mix, and burn,
~coolmel

styless said...

Like in Sweden we here in Denmark also call it a "Snabel-A". But if I talk to an American or have to explain it English i would say AT.

Brian said...

I think if the & for "and" gets to be called "ampersand", then the @ for "at" should be called "ampersat".

Lizzy said...

Although you had some great responses, how can you beat Brian's - I will now think of the @ as the ampersat - perfect - brilliant =- simple. Einstein said something like "anyone can make something more complicated; it takes a genius to go in the other direction - something along those lines : ) - thanks Brian